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dc.contributor.advisorHill, Gretchen Dr.
dc.contributor.advisorLong Walker, JoAnne
dc.contributor.advisorGeiger, Wendy Dr.
dc.contributor.authorKulkarni, Ava
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-02T12:52:26Z
dc.date.available2019-04-02T12:52:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-08
dc.date.submitted2019-04-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://centralspace.ucmo.edu/handle/123456789/696
dc.description.abstractThis research looked at a music therapist’s and certified nursing assistants’ perceptions of the effects of music on the lives of nursing home residents suffering from dementia. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews of 6 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and 1 music therapist working at a nursing home. Qualitative analysis indicated that dementia residents were often anxious, depressed, aggressive, socially isolated and combative towards their caregivers. Interviewees observed that implementing music in the everyday lives of these residents generally helped them relax, calm down, and be in a better mood to interact and cooperate with their nursing staff and fellow residents. In the perspectives of the CNAs and the therapist, music shows promise as a means to improve the quality of life for residents with dementia and also helps caregivers assist residents with their activities of daily living with much more ease by getting the residents to cooperate with them.en_US
dc.titleNURSING HOME MUSIC THERAPIST AND CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS' PERSPECTIVE ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF MUSIC THERAPY ON OLDER ADULTS WITH DEMENTIAen_US


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    Theses written by graduate students at the University of Central Missouri.

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